Seeing is Believing – Touring Angkor – Days 2 & 3

After another fine lunch at a restaurant near Angkor Wat temple, we returned to Angkor Tom, to visit the last temple within that complex, the Bayon.  I had seen it from afar, a great temple mountain, but appearing even more complicated than other structures there.  I had no idea.20181226_142331

The Bayon is perhaps best described as temples within temples, with later renovations simply added on top of previous structures.  There are 37 remaining towers, with Buddha heads on most sides.  The effect, once you get inside, is dizzying and just stupendous.  20181226_143831

It’s also a wee bit claustrophobic.  But even when you looked down, there was beautiful craftsmanship on display.

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The Buddha heads at every turn can lead to having a little fun.20181226_145620

It’s not everyday one goes nose to nose with Buddha.20181226_144617

No, we were not the first tourists to do this, nor will we be the last.  I’m sure Buddha understands and is at peace with it.

The Bayon is, like many of the other temples in the Angkor Archaeological Park, still an active shrine, where visitors are welcome to pay their respects and meditate for a few moments.  I was instructed to remove both my hat and shoes prior to entering.  It was a quiet, peaceful space, scented with burning incense. CAM_0229

 

We made our way around and through this amazing structure, ending our tour at the lower level where our guide, Thearith Moeun (John), showed us the extraordinary bas-relief carvings on the lower enclosure.  Here, a woman is being assisted as she gives birth.20181226_152104

All of the professional Cambodian guides receive a university education, and are well-versed in the history of the temples.  However, John charmed us both, and we were a little sad to part company.20181226_151324

 

After a day of rest, and a brief introduction to Cambodian cuisine via a cooking class, we were ready to resume our wandering.  We were introduced to our new guide, Mr. Hem Sothea, a soft-spoken former monk, who would provide us with thorough and detailed explanations for all that we would see. CAM_0257

Our first stop was Preah Khan, a temple a short distance from Angkor Tom.  It was very similar to Ta Prohm in it’s disheveled loveliness.

And like at Ta Prohm, nature is taking back its’ own.20181228_111718

There were narrow interior and exterior passageways,

and intriguing sculptures.20181228_104046

There was also this graceful columned structure apart from the temple, a two-storied building with no trace of a stair inside.  Experts say it may have been a granary, but I wonder, just because I can’t imagine using such a treasure for such a mundane purpose.20181228_110241

We left Preah Khan’s disintegrating splendor, and settled in for a 45-minute ride through the countryside to the north of the main park.  There we would explore the delicate gem that is Banteay Srei temple.  This temple is a small treasure, ariot with detail, made of pink sandstone.  It must have been a brilliant sight when it was built. 20181228_141151

This is a closeup of one of the towers.  Intricate does not begin to describe it.20181228_142753

There was more elaborate carving at every turn.

And then there were these guys.  I love these guys, guarding Banteay Srei for all eternity.20181228_142459

There was also drama.  I am not sure quite what’s going on here, but it is fraught.20181228_142827

We took some time here after touring the temple to listen to a traditional Khmer band.  All of the members had been injured by landmines.  We saw a number of these musical groups outside various temples.  Unexploded landmines remain a plague upon the country.20181228_143413

 

Our final temple was Pre Rup, from the mid-10th century.  It’s an imposing group of towers, on the east side of the park, with beautiful views.20181228_153954

The sculptures here were faded by time, but still possessed a majesty and grace that cannot be erased. 20181228_153529

Awe. Admiration. Respect. Joy. Peace. Wonder. Serenity.  In the course of three days, walking around these ancient, glorious, fantastic structures, I felt all of those things, and more.  In immersing myself in this ancient past, I felt restored.  A world that holds these things in it is a world worth preserving and protecting.  It was a privilege I will not soon forget, to have seen the wonders of Angkor with my own eyes.

Seeing is Believing – Touring the Temples of Angkor – Angkor Wat

On our second day of touring the temples of Angkor Archaeological Park , we began our day at Angkor Wat.  First, one crosses the broad moat surrounding the former city.  The temple towers are in the distance.  The bridge here is a temporary, floating structure, while the nearby bridge is being repaired.    20181226_094833.jpg

Our guide, Thearith Moeun, aka ‘John’, escorted us across, and instead of entering the interior via the imposing main gate,20181226_095320

we entered through this lovely side gate.20181226_095543

We stopped inside the outer enclosure for what is an obligatory photo with the towers in the background.  I look at it now, and feel the sense of wonder return.

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The wonder is somewhat tempered by the sad muck at the edge of the pond.  Before going further, I will note that despite the park management’s efforts at controlling litter, it is everywhere.  While it is certainly the responsibility of the park to provide places to put garbage, I also think it is the responsibility of visitors to pick up after themselves, particularly in a place which is still an active religious shrine.   It just struck me as sad and rude, that people would be so careless in this of all places.

We moved on, and the towers of the central level of the three-tiered pyramid that is Angkor Wat came into clearer focus.

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It is surrounded by a large courtyard, and an interior enclosure of four colonnades, containing bas-relief carvings of great Hindu tales.  The exterior walkway of the colonnade, all by itself, was just perfection, a symphony of balance and grace with its’ beautifully ornamented columns and lintels. 20181226_101658

There were 600 meters (over 656 yards) of bas-relief carvings, along the interior walls of the four sides of the enclosure, telling the ancient Hindu legends.  I will be content to simply show a couple of my favorite examples.

Here, we have a king and I’m guessing his general, on a great elephant, leading his armies, surrounded by trees and umbrellas.  This was a time before sunscreen.  I think the spiky adornments atop their respective helmets are amazing.  Those are serious hats.  I love the ornamentation everywhere – in their battle gear, the elephant’s saddle, necklace and headdress, even the delicately lovely, if seemingly silly, umbrellas.  All this beauty, in the service of depicting war.20181226_103018

Here, what I found most striking was the different faces.  The artist made sure that the soldiers he depicted were not just faceless minions, but individual people.  Even the ornaments atop the helmets are each slightly different.

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We gloried in the carvings through the south and east sides of the enclosure, and then John led us inside.  And there was a temple of Angkor Wat, rising above me towards a perfect blue sky.  I admired the steep stairs leading up to the grand, second level entrance.  I loved the layers of stone, striped by the weather through the ages.

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I paused for a few moments, in the stone-lined inner courtyard, just to take it all in.  I don’t know that I have words to describe how happy I am at this moment, just being awed by what I see.  I think the nice Roger captured that feeling perfectly.CAM_0185

You can’t rest long, though, because there is so much more to see.  There are devas.  Once again, please note the glory of their headpieces.  Not to mention the tininess of their waists.20181226_110705

There were intricately carved lintels.  This one appears to depict a human pyramid, surrounded by a snake with three heads at both ends.  Note the fierceness of the warriors’ expressions and the flexed arms of those on the lower levels.  20181226_110859

This is one of the stairs of Angkor Wat.  They’re very steep and the steps are tiny.   There are no handrails.  My thought was, you really have to want to go up, to use those stairs.

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While thankfully we did not have to negotiate these stairs, the ones we did climb, while modern, were still impressively steep.  The railings were handy if you needed to pull yourself up.

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Once on the second level, along with a limited number of our fellow tourists, we wandered through.  We found delicately beautiful carvings.

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The views from this vantage point were spectacular.

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There were monks, going about their business, once again providing evidence that Angkor Wat’s life as a temple is not past, it is ongoing.  I found it both moving and reassuring, that Angkor remains as vibrantly alive as the jungle surrounding it.

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I took a few moments myself, in one of the four cruciform areas, to once again, sit, and take in my surroundings.  And while the yoga assan may be just a pose for a photo, the desire to contemplate, to be in the moment as much as possible, was both strong and quite real.  I mean, look at that stunning structure, and envision, as I was, a king of old, coming out to sit and contemplate affairs of state, while sitting beside his private pool.  I felt glorious.

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As we left Angkor Wat, John directed us where to stand, so we could take the same photographs that countless tourists have taken before us, of Angkor Wat, reflected in the pool before it.   Its’ beauty cannot be overstated.   I’ve seen it with my own eyes.

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